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The sea-crosser’s paradox: how drowning at sea has become a crime control strategy and why human rights do nothing about it.

Title
The sea-crosser’s paradox: how drowning at sea has become a crime control strategy and why human rights do nothing about it.
Speaker(s)
Speaker: Francesca Soliman # University of Edinburgh
Hosted by
Introduced by
Date and Time
22nd Nov 2017 16:00 - 22nd Nov 2017 17:00
Location
Seminar Room 4, CMB
URL
http://www.pol.ed.ac.uk/events/other_events/2017_2018/the_sea-crossers_paradox_how_drowning_at_sea_has_become_a_crime_control_strategy_and_why_human_rights_do_nothing_about_it.

Edinburgh Europa Research Group Seminar:

Francesca Soliman, Edinburgh School of Law: The sea-crosser’s paradox: how drowning at sea has become a crime control strategy and why human rights do nothing about it.

The increasingly common framing of migration through a criminal lens has turned migration control into a form of crime prevention which decreases legal safeguards and yet attracts limited critical scrutiny. The rise of ‘crimmigration’, i.e. the blurring of boundaries between criminal and migration law, has created a hybrid legal framework. Non-citizens inhabit a state of exception in criminal law. Francesca Soliman suggests that a social harm approach is best suited to critically evaluate states of exception in contemporary crimmigration control practice

For more information, please click here.

Edinburgh Students